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Battery Directive

Product introduction: EU Battery Directive 2006/66/ECOn May 2, 2006, the European Union adopted draft new battery directive No. 98. On September 6 of the same year, the new battery directive 2006/66/EC came into effect, while abolishing the original battery directive (91/157/EEC) and its revised provisions (98/101/EC and 93/86/EEC). Each member state must convert the new battery directive into domestic legislation by September 26, 2008.1. Purpose of the instructionThe directive aims to reduce the production of harmful batteries and batteries, improve the recycling, treatment, and recycling rates of old batteries and batteries, and increase the amount of collected and recycled battery and battery waste.2. Product scope covered by the directiveThe directive covers all types of batteries (except for batteries used in member states' security and military equipment, as well as batteries used in space). The scope of Directive 91/157/EEC has been expanded to apply only to old batteries containing certain amounts of cadmium, mercury, and lead.3. Content of instructions(1) Prohibit batteries with mercury content exceeding 0.0005% (excluding button batteries with mercury content exceeding 2%); Prohibit portable batteries and batteries with cadmium content exceeding 0.002% (excluding batteries for alarm systems, medical equipment, and cordless power tools).(2) All batteries consumed in the market need to be recycled. The recovery rate should be at least 25% in September 2012 and 45% in September 2016.(3) The reuse rate of batteries should reach the following goals in 2011: at least 65% for lead-acid batteries and batteries, at least 75% for nickel cadmium batteries and batteries, and at least 50% for other batteries and batteries.(4) End users need to be informed through the following methods:a) Through promotional materials, inform the potential impact of batteries or substances in batteries on the environment and human health, as well as the collection and recycling methods for discarded batteries;b) Directly informed at the point of sale;C) Visual identification on the battery should include the following information: recycling label, capacity of the battery or battery, chemical symbols Hg, Cd, and Pb (if the content of mercury, cadmium, and lead exceeds 0.0005%, 0.002%, and 0.004%, respectively).Packaging requirements1. Unless installed in a device (such as a mobile phone, camera, walkie talkie, laptop, etc.), the battery and original battery must be separately packaged to prevent short circuits and packaged in a sturdy outer packaging.2. Unless installed in the equipment, if each packaging contains more than 24 primary batteries or 12 batteries, the following requirements must also be met:1) Each packaging must be marked to indicate the lithium battery inside and the special measures to be taken when the packaging is damaged.2) Each shipment must have accompanying documents explaining the special measures to be taken when the packaging contains lithium batteries and the packaging is damaged.3) Each packaging must be able to withstand a drop test of 1.2m in any orientation without damaging the batteries or meta batteries inside the packaging, without changing the position of the batteries so that they come into contact with each other (or the primary battery comes into contact with the primary battery), and without any batteries leaking out of the packaging.4) Unless lithium batteries are installed in the equipment, the gross weight of each packaging must not exceed 30kg.At present, EU countries have increasingly strict requirements for batteries, and there are specialized standards for batteries in 2006/66/EC. Among them, there are corresponding limits for the lead content, mercury content, and cadmium content in batteries. The 2006/66/EC standard for batteries is generally the same as the RoHS4 test content, except for the absence of a hexavalent chromium test.1. The use of mercury (Hg), cadmium (Cd), and lead (Pb) elements in batteries has received high attention: - The content of mercury (Hg) in button batteries does not exceed 2%, and mercury (Hg) in other batteries does not exceed 0.0005%- The content of cadmium (Cd) in the battery shall not exceed 0.002%- The above limit requirements do not apply to batteries used in the following four categories: - batteries in alarm or emergency systems (including emergency lights)- Batteries used in medical equipment- Batteries in cordless electric tools (until September 2010 when the exemption was re evaluated)- Dedicated batteries for military, national security, or launch into space;2. Identification of batteries - indicates the identification of forked trash cans that need to be classified for recycling- Batteries with mercury (Hg) content exceeding 0.0005%, cadmium (Cd) content exceeding 0.002%, and lead (Pb) content exceeding 0.004% must indicate the corresponding element symbol and its content - battery type, safe installation and disassembly method statement - below the trash can label3. Battery recycling - Pre recycling treatment should at least include removing any liquid or acidic substances contained in the battery - the recovery rate should meet the requirements: 65% - lead-acid waste batteries; 75% - Nickel cadmium waste battery; 50% - Other waste batteries;Note: If battery products comply with the Battery Directive, they do not need to repeatedly comply with the RoHS Directive.
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Battery Directive
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EU Battery Directive 2006/66/EC

On May 2, 2006, the European Union adopted draft new battery directive No. 98. On September 6 of the same year, the new battery directive 2006/66/EC came into effect, while abolishing the original battery directive (91/157/EEC) and its revised provisions (98/101/EC and 93/86/EEC). Each member state must convert the new battery directive into domestic legislation by September 26, 2008.

1. Purpose of the instruction

The directive aims to reduce the production of harmful batteries and batteries, improve the recycling, treatment, and recycling rates of old batteries and batteries, and increase the amount of collected and recycled battery and battery waste.

2. Product scope covered by the directive

The directive covers all types of batteries (except for batteries used in member states' security and military equipment, as well as batteries used in space). The scope of Directive 91/157/EEC has been expanded to apply only to old batteries containing certain amounts of cadmium, mercury, and lead.

3. Content of instructions

(1) Prohibit batteries with mercury content exceeding 0.0005% (excluding button batteries with mercury content exceeding 2%); Prohibit portable batteries and batteries with cadmium content exceeding 0.002% (excluding batteries for alarm systems, medical equipment, and cordless power tools).

(2) All batteries consumed in the market need to be recycled. The recovery rate should be at least 25% in September 2012 and 45% in September 2016.

(3) The reuse rate of batteries should reach the following goals in 2011: at least 65% for lead-acid batteries and batteries, at least 75% for nickel cadmium batteries and batteries, and at least 50% for other batteries and batteries.

(4) End users need to be informed through the following methods:

a) Through promotional materials, inform the potential impact of batteries or substances in batteries on the environment and human health, as well as the collection and recycling methods for discarded batteries;

b) Directly informed at the point of sale;

C) Visual identification on the battery should include the following information: recycling label, capacity of the battery or battery, chemical symbols Hg, Cd, and Pb (if the content of mercury, cadmium, and lead exceeds 0.0005%, 0.002%, and 0.004%, respectively).

Packaging requirements

1. Unless installed in a device (such as a mobile phone, camera, walkie talkie, laptop, etc.), the battery and original battery must be separately packaged to prevent short circuits and packaged in a sturdy outer packaging.

2. Unless installed in the equipment, if each packaging contains more than 24 primary batteries or 12 batteries, the following requirements must also be met:

1) Each packaging must be marked to indicate the lithium battery inside and the special measures to be taken when the packaging is damaged.

2) Each shipment must have accompanying documents explaining the special measures to be taken when the packaging contains lithium batteries and the packaging is damaged.

3) Each packaging must be able to withstand a drop test of 1.2m in any orientation without damaging the batteries or meta batteries inside the packaging, without changing the position of the batteries so that they come into contact with each other (or the primary battery comes into contact with the primary battery), and without any batteries leaking out of the packaging.

4) Unless lithium batteries are installed in the equipment, the gross weight of each packaging must not exceed 30kg.

At present, EU countries have increasingly strict requirements for batteries, and there are specialized standards for batteries in 2006/66/EC. Among them, there are corresponding limits for the lead content, mercury content, and cadmium content in batteries. The 2006/66/EC standard for batteries is generally the same as the RoHS4 test content, except for the absence of a hexavalent chromium test.

1. The use of mercury (Hg), cadmium (Cd), and lead (Pb) elements in batteries has received high attention: - The content of mercury (Hg) in button batteries does not exceed 2%, and mercury (Hg) in other batteries does not exceed 0.0005%- The content of cadmium (Cd) in the battery shall not exceed 0.002%- The above limit requirements do not apply to batteries used in the following four categories: - batteries in alarm or emergency systems (including emergency lights)- Batteries used in medical equipment- Batteries in cordless electric tools (until September 2010 when the exemption was re evaluated)- Dedicated batteries for military, national security, or launch into space;

2. Identification of batteries - indicates the identification of forked trash cans that need to be classified for recycling- Batteries with mercury (Hg) content exceeding 0.0005%, cadmium (Cd) content exceeding 0.002%, and lead (Pb) content exceeding 0.004% must indicate the corresponding element symbol and its content - battery type, safe installation and disassembly method statement - below the trash can label

3. Battery recycling - Pre recycling treatment should at least include removing any liquid or acidic substances contained in the battery - the recovery rate should meet the requirements: 65% - lead-acid waste batteries; 75% - Nickel cadmium waste battery; 50% - Other waste batteries;

Note: If battery products comply with the Battery Directive, they do not need to repeatedly comply with the RoHS Directive.


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