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Product introduction: EU Battery Directive 2006/66/ECOn May 2, 2006, the European Union passed the draft new battery directive No. 98. On September 6 of the same year, the new battery directive 2006/66/EC began to be implemented, and the original battery directive (91/157/EEC) and Its amendments (98/101/EC and 93/86/EEC). Member states must translate the new battery directive into national legislation by September 26, 2008.1. Purpose of the DirectiveThe Directive aims to reduce the production of harmful batteries and accumulators, increase the rate of recovery, treatment and recycling of used batteries and accumulators, and increase the amount of battery and accumulator waste collected and recycled.2. Scope of products covered by the DirectiveThe Directive covers all types of batteries (except for those used in the safety and military equipment of member states, and those used in space). The scope of the Directive 91/157/EEC, which only applies to old batteries containing certain amounts of cadmium, mercury and lead, has been expanded.3. Contents of the command(1) The mercury content in batteries is prohibited to exceed 0.0005% (except for button batteries with a mercury content of more than 2%); the cadmium content in portable batteries and accumulators is prohibited to exceed 0.002% (except for batteries used in alarm systems, medical equipment and cordless power tools).(2) All used batteries on the market need to be recycled. The recovery rate should be at least 25% in September 2012 and at least 45% in September 2016.(3) The reuse rate of batteries should reach the following targets in 2011: at least 65% for lead-acid batteries and accumulators, at least 75% for nickel-cadmium batteries and accumulators, and at least 50% for other batteries and accumulators.(4) End users need to be informed in the following ways:a) Through publicity materials, inform the potential impact of the substances in batteries or accumulators on the environment and human body, and the collection and recycling methods of waste batteries when they are disposed of;b) be informed directly at the point of sale;c) Visual identification on the battery shall cover the following information: recycling symbol, capacity of the battery or accumulator, chemical symbols Hg, Cd and Pb (if the content of mercury, cadmium and lead exceeds 0.0005%, 0.002% and 0.004% respectively) ).Packaging requirements1. Unless installed in equipment (such as in mobile phones, cameras, walkie-talkies, notebook computers, etc.), batteries and primary batteries must be packaged separately to prevent short-circuiting, and installed in sturdy outer packaging.2. Unless installed in equipment, each package containing more than 24 primary batteries or 12 batteries must also meet the following requirements:1) Each package must be marked with lithium batteries and special measures to be taken when the package is damaged.2) Each shipment must have a random document to explain the special measures to be taken when the lithium battery is contained in the package and the package is damaged.3) Each package must be able to withstand a 1.2m drop test in any orientation without damaging the batteries or primary batteries in the package, and without changing the position of the batteries so that the batteries (or primary batteries and primary batteries) interact with each other. contact, no battery leaked from the package.4) Unless lithium batteries are installed in the equipment, the gross weight of each package shall not exceed 30kg.At present, the requirements for batteries in EU countries are becoming more and more strict, and there are special battery standards 2006/66/EC, in which the requirements for lead content, tribute content and cadmium content in batteries have corresponding limits. of. The 2006/66/EC standard of the battery is basically the same as the test content of the RoHS4 item, but there is one less test for hexavalent chromium.1. The use of mercury (Hg), cadmium (Cd), and lead (Pb) elements in batteries is highly concerned: - The mercury (Hg) content in button batteries does not exceed 2%, and the mercury (Hg) in other batteries does not exceed 0.0005 %; - Cadmium (Cd) content in batteries does not exceed 0.002%; - The above limit requirements do not apply to batteries used in the following four categories: - Batteries in alarm or emergency systems (including emergency lights); - Used in medical equipment Batteries; - Batteries in cordless power tools (this exemption will not be re-evaluated until September 2010); - Special purpose batteries for military, national security or to be launched into space;2. Battery identification - a crossed trash can mark indicating that the battery needs to be sorted and recycled; - batteries with a mercury (Hg) content exceeding 0.0005%, cadmium (Cd) content exceeding 0.002%, and lead (Pb) content exceeding 0.004% The corresponding element symbol and its content should be marked under the trash can symbol - battery type, safe installation and disassembly instructions3. Battery recycling - pre-recycling treatment at least includes removing any liquid or acidic substances contained in the battery - the recycling rate must meet the requirements: 65%--lead-acid waste battery; 75%--nickel-cadmium waste battery; 50%-- other used batteries;Note: If battery products comply with the Battery Directive, they do not need to comply with the RoHS Directive repeatedly.
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EU Battery Directive 2006/66/EC

On May 2, 2006, the European Union passed the draft new battery directive No. 98. On September 6 of the same year, the new battery directive 2006/66/EC began to be implemented, and the original battery directive (91/157/EEC) and Its amendments (98/101/EC and 93/86/EEC). Member states must translate the new battery directive into national legislation by September 26, 2008.

1. Purpose of the Directive

The Directive aims to reduce the production of harmful batteries and accumulators, increase the rate of recovery, treatment and recycling of used batteries and accumulators, and increase the amount of battery and accumulator waste collected and recycled.

2. Scope of products covered by the Directive

The Directive covers all types of batteries (except for those used in the safety and military equipment of member states, and those used in space). The scope of the Directive 91/157/EEC, which only applies to old batteries containing certain amounts of cadmium, mercury and lead, has been expanded.

3. Contents of the command

(1) The mercury content in batteries is prohibited to exceed 0.0005% (except for button batteries with a mercury content of more than 2%); the cadmium content in portable batteries and accumulators is prohibited to exceed 0.002% (except for batteries used in alarm systems, medical equipment and cordless power tools).

(2) All used batteries on the market need to be recycled. The recovery rate should be at least 25% in September 2012 and at least 45% in September 2016.

(3) The reuse rate of batteries should reach the following targets in 2011: at least 65% for lead-acid batteries and accumulators, at least 75% for nickel-cadmium batteries and accumulators, and at least 50% for other batteries and accumulators.

(4) End users need to be informed in the following ways:

a) Through publicity materials, inform the potential impact of the substances in batteries or accumulators on the environment and human body, and the collection and recycling methods of waste batteries when they are disposed of;

b) be informed directly at the point of sale;

c) Visual identification on the battery shall cover the following information: recycling symbol, capacity of the battery or accumulator, chemical symbols Hg, Cd and Pb (if the content of mercury, cadmium and lead exceeds 0.0005%, 0.002% and 0.004% respectively) ).

Packaging requirements

1. Unless installed in equipment (such as in mobile phones, cameras, walkie-talkies, notebook computers, etc.), batteries and primary batteries must be packaged separately to prevent short-circuiting, and installed in sturdy outer packaging.

2. Unless installed in equipment, each package containing more than 24 primary batteries or 12 batteries must also meet the following requirements:

1) Each package must be marked with lithium batteries and special measures to be taken when the package is damaged.

2) Each shipment must have a random document to explain the special measures to be taken when the lithium battery is contained in the package and the package is damaged.

3) Each package must be able to withstand a 1.2m drop test in any orientation without damaging the batteries or primary batteries in the package, and without changing the position of the batteries so that the batteries (or primary batteries and primary batteries) interact with each other. contact, no battery leaked from the package.

4) Unless lithium batteries are installed in the equipment, the gross weight of each package shall not exceed 30kg.

At present, the requirements for batteries in EU countries are becoming more and more strict, and there are special battery standards 2006/66/EC, in which the requirements for lead content, tribute content and cadmium content in batteries have corresponding limits. of. The 2006/66/EC standard of the battery is basically the same as the test content of the RoHS4 item, but there is one less test for hexavalent chromium.

1. The use of mercury (Hg), cadmium (Cd), and lead (Pb) elements in batteries is highly concerned: - The mercury (Hg) content in button batteries does not exceed 2%, and the mercury (Hg) in other batteries does not exceed 0.0005 %; - Cadmium (Cd) content in batteries does not exceed 0.002%; - The above limit requirements do not apply to batteries used in the following four categories: - Batteries in alarm or emergency systems (including emergency lights); - Used in medical equipment Batteries; - Batteries in cordless power tools (this exemption will not be re-evaluated until September 2010); - Special purpose batteries for military, national security or to be launched into space;

2. Battery identification - a crossed trash can mark indicating that the battery needs to be sorted and recycled; - batteries with a mercury (Hg) content exceeding 0.0005%, cadmium (Cd) content exceeding 0.002%, and lead (Pb) content exceeding 0.004% The corresponding element symbol and its content should be marked under the trash can symbol - battery type, safe installation and disassembly instructions

3. Battery recycling - pre-recycling treatment at least includes removing any liquid or acidic substances contained in the battery - the recycling rate must meet the requirements: 65%--lead-acid waste battery; 75%--nickel-cadmium waste battery; 50%-- other used batteries;

Note: If battery products comply with the Battery Directive, they do not need to comply with the RoHS Directive repeatedly.

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